Posts Tagged ‘marketing’

Marketing Power Tools – Building efficiency through effective use of power tools

June 24, 2010

In the same way that two men using power nailers can roof a house in less than a day versus a week using manual hammers, our clients utilize LiveTechnology’s platform of marketing power tools to take cost, time, and hassle out of the process of managing large advertising production management tasks such as ad localization and versioning.  That said, in the same way that construction power tools have specific designed-in capabilities and are sized for the job at hand – so it goes for marketing automation.  In this issue, we take a look at how to evaluate how your organization could benefit from using LiveTechnology’s “power tools”.

A simple process:

When you boil down the process of getting an advertising or marketing message into the marketplace, it really comes down to three simple steps:

  • Create/Ideate:  In this process, the message is ideated, created, written, shot, recorded, etc.  Typically this function is performed by creative services departments at either agencies or within companies.  At this step, people think of the idea and then execute it into something that can be used in the second step.
  • Production:  Production is the process of synthesizing the output of the creative process into something that can be consumed by the third step …
  • Media and Manufacturing:  Media and Manufacturing is the process of utilizing the output of the creative and production steps to deliver the message to the intended audience.  This includes media outlets and channels such as newspapers, websites, magazines, TV stations, direct marketing and more, and includes manufacturing processes such as POP, printing, and more.

The process is relatively efficient and capital-intensive at the ends of the process – and has lots of room for improvement in the middle.

A Question:

Our clients often call us intrigued by the concepts and then struggle to apply them until we help them define how to judge whether or not you need “power tools” in your marketing.  The question always is “Well, how do I know if this is going to work for MY company?”

The Answers:

Don’t you love it when someone answers your question in the form of another question?  The answers lie the questions you should ask yourself when considering the question “do I need marketing automation at my company to help build efficiency in our marketing process.”

1)      Do you have dealers/stores/sales reps/franchisees that sell your brand?

2)      Do those selling your brand at the transaction level use your brand in marketing?

3)      Are those selling your brand locally using your brand correctly?

4)      Do you have directly-owned distribution or is it two- or three-tier?

5)      Do you frequently run advertising in multiple newspapers or print publications on the same day?

6)      Do you have the need to target your ad message to those receiving it?

7)      Do you run online advertising where the message is targeted to either the location or demographic of those viewing the site?

8)      Do you source-code or in some other way, uniquely identify your advertising and marketing materials for the purpose of tracking?

9)      Do you have your agencies create multiple versions of the same thing for any possible reason?

10)   Do you have the need to share your brand’s assets and information with partners or other entities?

Just saying “yes” to a single criteria means you should take a serious look at utilizing marketing technology to build efficiency in your marketing efforts.  Like the use of power tools, using marketing technology application like LiveTechnology’s LiveRetail and LiveMarketer products shouldn’t be done unless you’ve given serious consideration to the job at hand.  But, with a well-founded business case, and well understood marketing needs, marketing automation technology can save up to 90% on the cost of marketing versioning and localization, reduce cycle times by up to 75%, increase advertising accuracy to a rate far greater than what can be achieved manually, and finally, increase your distribution network’s satisfaction with your brand.

Conclusion:

Like a power saw or a power nailer, using marketing automation tools like LiveTechnology’s products, needs to be considered carefully.   But, given the right set of circumstances, the results can be stunning.

~ Stewart Campbell,

Cross-Medium Ads Drive Sales

June 13, 2008

In a recent survey by Clark, Martire & Bartolomeo, one of the conclusions reached is “Seeing products and services advertised in multiple channels increased both consumer turst in them and likelihood to buy.”  Half of respondents said they were more likely to buy a product featured in a newspaper advertisement after seeing it online.

This is encouraging news for newspaper advertisers, and reinforces the idea that multiple medium advertising drives sales.  After viewing a newspaper advertisement, 31% who search online, go to a search engine.  Surprisingly, of the adults who use search engines, 70% purchased at a store or dealer following additional research online.

What does this mean for marketers?  First, marketers need to ensure they have a unified message across all forms of media.  Because most purchases are made in local stores, this means having consistent messaged from the local dealer or store is critical.

Second, markters need to USE multiple forms of media.  With increasing media fragmentation, using multiple forms of media is critical to effectively reach customers and drive them into the sales process.

Third, it’s essential that the web presence of a brand at the corporate and local level reflect the approved messages of the brand.  Customers who use a search engine and go to a local store or dealer website should have the same brand experience as if they were at the brand’s website.

It’s clear that all business is local – most sales still happen in a store, but the process of getting to the final transaction is dramatically changing.  Marketers must stay ahead of these changes to build brand equity while driving sales.

View the report at Marketing Charts.

Agencies Still Don’t Get It

May 23, 2008

In yesterday’s Wall Street Journal, the company avVenta was hailed as “reaping the rewards” of advertising agencies shipping work to overseas contractors to meet the demands of large scale production for online ads. As the article notes, “campaigns are labor-intensive to produce.” Why do agencies continue to rely on manual labor when technology can produce the same results for a fraction of the cost of even the cheapest outsourced labor?

With agencies executing campaigns that have display ads, websites, emails, search ads, videos and game with thousands of variations on each, who would rely on manual labor to create hundreds of thousands of versions when computers can create these in hours?

Imagine no longer having to send work halfway around the world and wait for it to be created and shipped back when an agency can keep all their production in house and execute it in hours.

No one would consider handwriting thousands of copies of documents when they can be created on a computer and sent to a high-capacity printer and created in minutes. Why would anyone consider creating hundreds of thousands of versions of any advertising materials by hand when a computer can do it in less time and for less money than even the cheapest manual labor?

Brands Use More Forms of Media

April 13, 2008

In an article in the New York Times, brands like Kimberly Clark, Johnson & Johnson and Coca-Cola are reportedly using more than traditional television advertising focusing on 30 second spots.  The brands are being encouraged to use more forms of media such as in-store, online and point-of-sale.

Recent research has shown that most customers are “touched” 6 times by different forms of media before making a purchasing decision.  This means that brands need a coordinated strategy to work across multiple forms of media.  However, national advertisements should be partnered with local advertisments that drive sales.  As Macy’s demonstrates, brands that will survive the current media fragmentation will work across multiple forms of media and have a coordinated national and local strategy.

To view the article, go to http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/10/business/media/10adco.html?ref=media

Project Canoe

March 19, 2008

In a follow-up to the post about a universal VOD metric, here’s an interesting NY Times article about how Project Canoe is “an effort to slow Google’s siphoning of advertising dollars away from television.”

Check out the article at The New York Times.